GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY

Published by

Crop Report September 25, 2019

Yes! FINALLY the temperatures will be a balmy (for California)… low 70’s… and it will be the “first” official Fall Saturday – so what are you waiting for? Come on up!!

Since it is apple season, let’s start off with the apples:
This week on the farm, the true star is our Ozark Gold apple. It is at the perfect peak of crispness and flavor.
Let’s talk about the Ozark Gold a minute.
This is definitely not an apple that has widespread household recognition.
Perhaps I have a special fondness in my heart for this apple because I once lived in Ozark, Missouri. Or maybe it is because it’s parentage is from a Golden Delicious and Ben Davis. Either way – this apple, when ripe, is just amazing.
It is a “newer” apple, introduced to the apple market in 1970, stemming from the University of Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station. The name of “Ozark” was given to this beauty because the Ozark region of Missouri (South West Missouri), was the leading apple producing area of the United States in 1890 (How fitting that the trees bearing this fine fruit are up at the Barn Terrace). It is truly golden with a pinkish blush where the sun touches it.
It is crisp, with a sweet, honey like taste to it, with little acidity. It also cooks well.
Along with the Ozark Gold – we are featuring the following:
  • Senshu is a newer apple (introduced in 1980), with a taste reminsicent of a Jonagold. Sweet and crisp – best for eating (not cooking). It is a cross of a Toko and a Fuji. Red and yellow striping with a white flesh.
  • Red Delicious: This is the first week of the Red Delicious and we do have some that have ripened enough to pick. Please only pick the reddest ones – as there are apples on the trees that are not ready just yet – please leave them be for following weeks.
  • Maidens Blush: This beautiful heritage apple is just as sweet and enticing as her name. Originating in Burlington, New Jersey in 1817, on the farm of Samuel Allison, this apple soon became a national favorite. It can have a bite early in the season, but now it is full of the flavor of honey and star anise. This apple is IDEAL for drying – it has been one of the best for drying since it’s inception.
  • Snow Apple is another heritage apple – even older than the Maiden’s Blush. It was first found noted in the Early 1600’s in France, then brought to America, by French Settlers, in the 1700’s. It is often referred to on the farm as the “Snow White Apple” because it is a gorgeous, deep red skin wrapped around a stunning white flesh. It is a favorite dessert apple (good for eating and pairing with cheeses and wines). It is believed to be a direct ancestor of the McIntosh apple and has a juicy, robust flavor, with a hint of strawberry.
  • Royal Gala is always a favorite, so make haste if you wish to grab your fresh-off-the-tree gala’s this season, as they are flying from the branches. These sweet, apples are named “Royal” because they were the favorite of Queen Elizabeth. These are great paired with the following wines: Chardonnay, White Burgundy, White Bordeaux, Pinot Blanc, Viognier, Riesling (off-dry), Gew├╝rztraminer.
BERRIES
  • We are light on all of our berries as we draw to the close of our berry season. We will still have them available on the weekend until they just can’t give any more.
PUMPKINS
  • As cute and quaint as our pumpkins are right now – they are NOT ready for picking – so please let them continue to grow. Look to the first part of October for us to open the pumpkin fields as everything this year is just a wee bit later than last season. The pumpkins are just fantastic and we will have several varieties ready for you throughout the Fall season. PLEASE do NOT venture out into the pumpkin patches (as tempting as it might be) as we need to leave the fields undisturbed for optimum growing conditions. ­čÖé
CORN
  • Our Indian corn is really coming on (despite the bears trampling a good portion of the stalks), but please let it be as it is still needing some growing time.
If you have been following the crop reports, you know that the varieties differ weekly – so do not put off your trip to come up and see us – you might just miss out … because (obscure 80’s and famous poem, reference coming) “nothing gold can stay”
See you soon!

Categorised in: , , , , , ,

This post was written by Jim Riley

Comments are closed here.