The New Year

by

 Krystle Hammond, Farm cook extraordinaire, reminds me that I haven’t written in the farm journal for quite some time, and she’s right. ( “Courage, New Hampshire” is pretty all consuming with me, and if you’re interested in what I have to say about pop culture and history, you can always check in with me there too.) 

The last year held some challenges for the farm, namely an extremely poor apple crop, so poor as to be almost nonexistent in some of the orchards. 

But… you all made up for it other ways. You bought more pumpkins and you rewarded our excellent farm barbecue and colonial public house with packed houses on some of the fall Saturdays. We also nearly sold out all of our living history dinner programs in the fall and winter. Another bright spot has been farm weddings; we’ve never had so many brides anxious for a farm wedding, in lots of different kinds of weather.

The farm, in some ways, is the victim of its own success. We have so many employees and family members who want to make a career of the place that we need to keep it growing. There are only so many Saturdays in the year, and only so much room that we hope to grow in ways the place can sustain over time, and we’re very anxious to take history and America out to the broader culture, through media. 

That’s as it should be. The early studios in California set themselves down in the middle of Orange Groves and ranch land. We want some of that action, and we actually have something to say, so stay tuned.

About Jim Riley

James Riley is the owner/operator of Riley's Farm in Oak Glen, California and a senior partner in Colony Bay Productions. The father of six children, Riley performs "Patrick Henry" and supervises a living history program visited by hundreds of thousands of school children. He holds a degree in history from Stanford University.
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